Roman mosaic, 2nd century CE, Palazzo Nuovo (Wikimedia Commons)

Say, pals, whaddya call a play not funny enough to be a comedy, not sad enough to be a tragedy? A history play! Just kidding. Mostly.* But really, you can put that old idea of tragicomedy in your pipe, because Beaumont and Fletcher fine-tuned a genre that deserves a better name. To get a sense…

Portrait of John Fletcher, Wikimedia Commons

As Brave Spirits Theatre prepares for our incest repertory of A King and No King with ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore, we’d love for our audience to get acquainted with the playwrights behind these stories … Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (A King and No King, printed 1619) Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher are the…

Photo by D J Corey Photography

The eponymous heroine of the early-17th-century play “The Maid’s Tragedy” could teach Ophelia a thing or two about rejection. Like Hamlet’s ex, Aspatia of Rhodes sees her relationship with a nobleman fall through in the aftermath of sinister court machinations. But does Aspatia lose her wits and go around distractedly handing out pansies and fennel?…

Photo by D J Corey Photography

David Siegel of DC Metro Theatre Arts gives The Maid’s Tragedy 4.5 stars and says, “Under the robust, effective direction of Angela Kay Pirko, The Maid’s Tragedy is forceful, determined and at times comically bawdy …” He also praises all the actors, Ian Blackwell Rogers gives a “disquieting, verbally bullying performance;” “Evadne is played with authority by…